Sunday, December 15, 2019
The RP Group

 2020 LFM Academies (Applications are now closed.)

This year LFM will be offering 3 year-long academies:

Two cohorts of (Re)designing the Student Experience focused on advancing colleges’ instructional and student support redesign efforts by grounding these endeavors in the student experience; in particular what happens in the classroom.

One cohort of Making Data Work for Student Success which will ground instructional and student support redesign efforts in inquiry and evidence with a focus on making data actionable.


Program Requirements

  • Each college will need to identify a cross-functional team of five people to participate in LFM.

  • Bring a project that is part of their college-wide redesign efforts to practice skills and strategies taught during the academy. Participants will practice leadership skills individually, collaboratively as a team, and collaboratively with other leaders back at their campus.

  • Secure a commitment from each team member to complete assigned readings, and participate in all three 2 ½-day face-to-face convenings of the academy. The curriculum builds on each convening to provide participants a year-long professional development program built around practice and application.

  • In between convenings, work with an LFM coach that will support each participating team implementing their project by applying and practicing the research-based leadership curriculum.


Location

The Kellogg West Conference Center in Pomona, CA. Ontario International Airport is the closest airport.


Cost

$1,000 per person, a substantial value due to the generous funding by the CCCCO. The cost includes registration, coaching, meals, and lodging. Space is limited to 12 teams per academy. 

To ground instructional and student support redesign efforts in the student experience the six enabling factors--directed, focused, nurtured, connected, engaged, and valued—identified by students as necessary to their success, in RP Group’s study Student Support (Re)defined, will be used as a framework to explore how middle leaders can use the student experience as a powerful driver to advocate for and advance institutional transformation.

With a deep understanding of the challenges faced by middle leaders, the LFM curriculum delivers the tools and strategies that are useful to middle leaders through a project-based learning model that blends individual and collaborative leadership skills. During the program, participants hone their abilities to:

  • Develop and build on their personal leadership identity

  • Apply critical inquiry skills to decision-making and communication

  • Engage resistance, build coalitions, and win buy-in to drive institutional-based reforms

  • Apply planning and design approaches to promote coherent strategies among efforts to improve student success including Guided Pathways, equity, and student progress, retention, and completion initiatives.

  • Situate institutional reform efforts in the student experience.

Identifying your LFM Team:

Each college should identify a team of up to five people to participate in LFM. Because this year's curriculum will focus on Pillar 4: Ensure Students are Learning, it is important that the team include instructional and counseling faculty as well as representatives from across the campus such as: middle-level administrators, managers and directors, classified, and an institutional researcher. College teams are highly encouraged to consider projects that directly impact classroom teaching and learning.

When putting a team together, colleges should: 

  • Assemble the team prior to the first Academy convening to obtain commitment.

  • Ensure all team members know why they were chosen to participate in LFM and are familiar with the academy’s goals and structure.

  • Identify a team lead that will be the liaison between the team and the LFM coach, assist in coordinating monthly coaching meeting, and work with the coach to plan site visits to the college.

  • Confirm everyone on the team is knowledgeable about the project that will be worked on throughout the academy and fully understand their role in the project. 

  • Establish team expectations and norms.

 

Making Data Work for Student Success is designed to support the development of middle leadership for college teams and individuals working to advance their instructional and student support redesign efforts by grounding these endeavors in inquiry and evidence. Utilizing inquiry as a departure point, colleges will gain the skills to make data actionable and build their capacity to transform their colleges into student-centered institutions.

With a deep understanding of the challenges faced by middle leaders, the LFM curriculum delivers the tools and strategies that are useful to middle leaders through a project-based learning model that blends individual and collaborative leadership and data skills. During the program, participants hone their abilities to: 

  • Develop and build on their personal leadership identity

  • Apply critical inquiry skills to decision-making and communication

  • Access publicly available data sources and navigate corresponding data platforms

  • Work with disaggregated data and methods for determining disproportionate impact

  • Engage resistance, build coalitions, and win buy-in to drive institutional-based reforms 

Identifying your LFM Team:

Each college must identify a team of five people to participate in LFM. Because this year's curriculum will focus on grounding instructional and student support redesign efforts in inquiry and evidence, it is important that the team include representatives from across the campus such as instructional and counseling faculty, middle-level administrators, managers, and directors, classified, and an institutional researcher. Colleges are encouraged to consider projects that directly address leading indicators of student success, and which are corroborated by evidence.

When putting a team together, colleges should:

  • Assemble the team prior to the first Academy convening to obtain commitment.

  • Identify a team lead that will be the liaison between the team and the LFM coach, assist in coordinating monthly coaching meeting, and work with the coach to plan site visits to the college.

  • Ensure all team members know why they were chosen to participate in LFM and are familiar with the academy’s goals and structure.

  • Confirm everyone on the team is knowledgeable about the project that will be worked on throughout the academy and fully understand their role in the project. 

  • Establish team expectations and norms.